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Sunday, April 28
 

3:00pm

Agile Alliance Lounge Open
Take a break from deliver:Agile2019 action and relax in the Agile Alliance Lounge! As an attendee, you are a member — we invite you to check out information about Alliance initiatives and activities, meet the board members and staff. While you’re there, don’t forget to enjoy a refreshing beverage, pick up some swag, and discover how you and your company can become more involved in the Agile community.

See you there!

Sunday April 28, 2019 3:00pm - 7:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

3:00pm

deliver:Collaborate
deliver:Collaborate is deliver:Agile 2019's self-organized gathering and collaboration space. The agenda is fluid, set by you, for you!

The comfortable and welcoming environment is designed to facilitate great collaboration – to help you meet and share ideas and technology with your new found industry friends and colleagues!

Do you want to practice what you are learning in the conference sessions?
Do you want to find new people to pair with on technical solutions or coding exercises?
Do you want to share your ideas or skills with others?
Or maybe you simply need a break and just want to have some fun
If so, come along and join in with impromptu questions, conversations, games, hacks, coding sessions, and more.

The deliver:Collaborate Space is open all day, every day, during the conference, from Sunday through Wednesday!

Sunday April 28, 2019 3:00pm - 7:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

3:00pm

 
Monday, April 29
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Monday April 29, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

Agile Alliance Lounge Open
Take a break from deliver:Agile2019 action and relax in the Agile Alliance Lounge! As an attendee, you are a member — we invite you to check out information about Alliance initiatives and activities, meet the board members and staff. While you’re there, don’t forget to enjoy a refreshing beverage, pick up some swag, and discover how you and your company can become more involved in the Agile community.

See you there!

Monday April 29, 2019 7:30am - 5:30pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

deliver:Collaborate
deliver:Collaborate is deliver:Agile 2019's self-organized gathering and collaboration space. The agenda is fluid, set by you, for you!

The comfortable and welcoming environment is designed to facilitate great collaboration – to help you meet and share ideas and technology with your new found industry friends and colleagues!

Do you want to practice what you are learning in the conference sessions?
Do you want to find new people to pair with on technical solutions or coding exercises?
Do you want to share your ideas or skills with others?
Or maybe you simply need a break and just want to have some fun
If so, come along and join in with impromptu questions, conversations, games, hacks, coding sessions, and more.

The deliver:Collaborate Space is open all day, every day, during the conference, from Sunday through Wednesday!

Monday April 29, 2019 7:30am - 5:30pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

8:30am

The Origins of Opera and the Future of Programming (Jessica Kerr)

Abstract:
There's a story to tell, about musicians, artists, philosophers, scientists, and then programmers.
There's a truth inside it that leads to a new view of work, that sees beauty in the painful complexity that is software development.
Starting from The Journal of the History of Ideas, Jessica traces the concept of an “invisible college” through music and art and science to programming. She finds the dark truth behind the 10x developer, a real definition of “Senior Developer” and a new name for our work and our teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • She finds the dark truth behind the 10x developer, a real definition of “Senior Developer” and a new name for our work and our teams.


Speakers

Monday April 29, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Hermitage Ballroom

10:00am

Morning Break
Monday April 29, 2019 10:00am - 10:20am
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

10:20am

Dev and Test Agility for your Database with Docker (Julie Lerman)

Abstract:
Agile practices teach us how to deal with evolving applications but so often the data store is overlooked as a component of your application lifecycle. Database servers are monolothic, resource intensive and mostly viewed as set in stone. Encapsulating your database server in a container and your database in a storage container can dramatically lighten the load and make your database as agile as your model and other processes. And you can even use a serious enterprise class database like SQL Server this way. This session will show how to benefit from using a containerized version of SQL Server for Linux during development and testing. We'll also address concerns about data that needs to be persisted. You'll also get a peek at the DevOps side of this, including using images in your CI/CD process.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Running SQL Server for Linux in docker in development environment
  • Script tests to spin up a running instance of SQL Server for test and then eliminate from memory
  • Comprehend life cycle of moving database/data into production and then back to dev/test for realistic testing

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Julie Lerman

Julie Lerman

Software Coach, The Data Farm
Julie Lerman is a Microsoft Regional Director, Docker Captain and a long-time Microsoft MVP who now counts her years as a coder in decades. She makes her living as a coach and consultant to software teams around the world. You can find Julie presenting on Data Access (including Microsoft's... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom C

10:20am

functional fundamentals: functional programming for the object-oriented engineer (Autumn Crossan)

Abstract:
"functional" is a word that gets thrown around a lot, especially in frontend web circles. problem is, functional programming seems completely unapproachable; it requires you to dedicate lots of time to understanding the math behind category theory, set theory, and discrete mathematics. right?
what if i told you i could give you three useful, functional-style fundamentals that you could grok quickly, understand intuitively, and use productively?
join me as we learn about higher-order functions, functional composition, and strategies for blending object-oriented and functional code to make an elegant, well-constructed whole.

Learning Outcomes:
  • learn more about functional programming
  • streamline the process of writing your object-oriented code with functional techniques
  • learn functional strategies to implement features and write code in a stateless manner


Speakers

Monday April 29, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom F

10:20am

Playing for the Future: How Games, Cadence, and Chaos help us adapt to our changing world (Chris Donnelly)

Abstract:
Volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA) describes our world more accurately each day.
These traits lead to a rapidly growing set of diverse problems across technical value networks. To stay afloat, decision makers, technical leaders, and influential individual contributors must acquire approaches apace.
We will explore play as a time-effective way to cultivate a diverse cognitive-toolkit for tackling the challenges of tomorrow across technical disciplines eg architecture, engineering, operations, UX, etc.
Through games and play (backed by research), we will discover:
  • Why not knowing is a superpower
  • What defusing bombs has to do with service downtime
  • The commonalities between spies and engineers
  • What cybernetics says about training in a rapidly moving domain
  • Why katas are the most powerful force in the universe
  • How balancing victory points and your economy can boost employee satisfaction

Learning Outcomes:
  • Use play to collaborate and problem solve across technical disciplines
  • Employ modern strategies for effective learning
  • Understand the difference between training and education, comfort and safety, and repeating and repetitive
  • Have more fun at work while creating value!


Speakers

Monday April 29, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom E

10:20am

The Agile Gap: Technical Practice, or, XP As We Would Do It Today (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)

Abstract:
The uptake of "Agile" methods has reduced focus on the practices and approaches that are needed to get the full benefit of the approach.
Read: Agile's not working as well as it could.
Often, development teams are not equipped to perform well in an "Agile" situation with the result that the teams, and the results, suffer.
Read: Agile often hurts developers.
Organizations push for results, and are not investing in the requisite training, or providing the needed slack for teams to learn to perform well.
Read: Pressure crushes progress.
We'll discuss what developers can do, and what the "Agile Industry" needs to do, to improve the lives of development team members.
Read: We've got some ideas. XP is in there.

Learning Outcomes:
  • We hope to inspire developers to focus on their own responsibilities, and to encourage their organizations to support effective Agile development.
  • Renewed focus on delivering shippable "Product Increments".
  • Ideas on using the Increment to improve our lives.
  • We'll describe what we and others are doing to influence the "Agile Industry" to address this problem.


Speakers
RJ

Ron Jeffries

RonJeffries.com
avatar for Chet Hendrickson

Chet Hendrickson

Supreme and Ultimate Hyper-Chairman Emeritus, HendricksonXP


Monday April 29, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom D

11:15am

A Parable of Mapping through Pivots and Transitions (Jabe Bloom)

Abstract:
This the story of a team of teams. A team of teams with a manager who reads on planes.
Having come back from a recent conference, our fearless manager has defined a significant pivot in strategy, and has challenged our friendly team of teams to achieve a new vision for the business.
How will our teams come to understand this strategy?
Come, listen to the tale of a team of teams, using Wardley mapping to navigate through the practical, architectural and organization issues they face implementing a disruptive change.
Take away a better understanding of the practical applications of Wardley Mapping to informing technical and organizational transitions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to READ a Wardley Map
  • How to work with teams and management with a Wardley Map
  • How to understand and plan for cost of change issues
  • How to dynamically team through pivots and transitions


Speakers
avatar for Jabe Bloom

Jabe Bloom

Chief SocioTechnical Officer, PraxisFlow
Jabe Bloom has led teams and companies and developed software and products for almost 20 years. He has served as a Chief Architect, Principal Technical Director and Chief Technical Officer. In each of these roles his focus has been on connecting creative, ideation processes with software... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

11:15am

Beyond Pear Shaped: The future of pairing (Marlena Compton)

Abstract:
Pair programming is in the midst of a renaissance. For a long time, pair programming was seen as just one of the 12 practices of the agile methodology, Extreme Programming, but pair programming is now flourishing on its own whether it is used in an XP environment or not.
Marlena will talk about the history of pair programming as it fits into the history of software and what it means in a current cloud environment. Attendees will get an advanced perspective on pairing, what they can do to encourage pairing and when they might not want to pair.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will get an advanced perspective on pairing, what they can do to encourage pairing and when they might not want to pair.


Speakers

Monday April 29, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

11:15am

Deep Stack - Tracer Bullets from ADC to Browser (James Grenning)

Abstract:
A blank page can be very intimidating, even for a Test-driven developer. Where do we start? Write a test, right? Not always.
I've heard TDD learners say: "I don't know what my code needs to do, how can I write a test? I need to write some code first." I used to make a flippant reply to that, like: "You don't know what your code needs to do! How could you possibly start with the code! Tests describe what the code must do. How can you write the code if you don't know what the code is supposed to do?"
Sometimes, it's simply a matter of software with interface, boundaries and constraints understood or under your control. When it's simply a matter of software, take some guidance from ZOMBIES! Start with the simplest cases (Zero an One) to get the Interface in place, generalize (to Many) and then make sure the anticipated Exceptional and Boundary cases are all covered with Simple test scenarios. ZOMBIES can really help, except when they can't.
With my most recent green-field side-project, interacting with Commercial Off The Shelf hardware and software (COTS),I found that unknowns prevented me from writing tests. I totally get that helpless feeling (again) of not knowing what test to write! In Hexagonal Architecture (a.k.a. Ports and Adapters), we strive to separate the land where ZOMBIES rule and where we need something else. In the core of the hexagonal architecture, ZOMBIES rule, in the Adapters we need to discover what works.
In this session we'll look at how ZOMBIES help sneak up on the solution. In the adapters we need a DIRECT approach to Determine, discover and Isolate Risk, and Encapsulate Current Technology. DIRECT helps isolate and understand things out of our control.
In this talk we'll explore the challenges and risks developing a real-time water pressure measuring system. We'll look at how to get to a walking skeleton of the product together by discovering what is needed to get this stack of technologies elements working together:
  • Analog to digital converter (ADC)
  • Serial peripheral interface (SPI)
  • Micro-controller
  • IoT radio
  • IoT mesh network
  • Little Linux box
  • Web-server
  • JSON and javascript driven browser.
In a multi-layered system like this there are unknowns hide at every boundary. We'll look at how we address the unknowns DIRECTly, striving to get to where ZOMBIES can guide. Integration is considered from the beginning because that is where the risk is.
There are more risks than strictly technical risks. Business risk assessment will impact technical choices. If we can build it, will it be affordable and profitable? How do we track progress in the face of significant risk. We'll look at both the technical approach and how to keep progress and risk mitigation visible.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How ZOMBIES can guide TDD
  • When the DIRECT approach is needed (Determine, discover and Isolate Risk; Encapsulate Current Technology)
  • Procrastination, when to, when not to.
  • The role of spike stories during prototyping
  • Using cause and effect
  • Design for test
  • Dependency management
  • Integration first
  • Tracer bullets, spikes, walking skeletons


Speakers
avatar for James Grenning

James Grenning

President, Engineer, Coach, ..., Wingman Software Consulting
James Grenning’s trains, coaches and consults worldwide. With decades of software development experience, both technical and managerial, James brings knowledge, skill, and creativity to software development teams and their management.  As his professional roots are in embedded... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

11:15am

Introduction to Kafka Streams (Pooja Rallabhandi)

Abstract:
Apache Kafka is a high-performance distributed streaming platform. It is a scalable publish-subscribe messaging system that helps in building real-time applications with simple data pipelines that transform and react to the incoming streams of data. Over the past years big-data companies have struggled with low-latency ingestion of large volumes of event data and the demand to be continuously reactive as the data arrives. Existing message queues are not an ideal solution when applications require high-throughput and fault-tolerant publish-subscribe messaging system. Kafka provides a platform for developing applications that react to streams of data to do real-time analytics, transform, aggregate real-time data flows and perform complex event processing. In this session my aim is to introduce the basic concepts of Kafka and Kafka-streams and provide use-cases where Kafka has proven to be a better solution for building event-driven applications.

Learning Outcomes:
  • This session will introduce you to the concepts of Kafka and Kafka-streams and help you build next-generation event driven applications.



Monday April 29, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

12:00pm

Sponsor Exhibits
Sponsors are an important element of deliver:Agile 2019. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in Hermitage AB.

Monday April 29, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom AB

12:00pm

Lunch
Monday April 29, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Hermitage Ballroom AB

1:30pm

All Hands On Deck: Rallying Teams Around Test Plans (Ash Coleman)

Abstract:
Imagine you have a grand piano in your living room. Now imagine you are moving homes and you would like to take your beloved piano with you. What is the first thing you would do? Jump straight to the task? Start pushing it along, attempting to advance it as far as you can?
Well if you are smart, the idea of moving a piano by yourself, or perhaps with yourself and one other person alone, should leave you thinking twice about your logic. The weight of the piano is grand, no pun intended, but also the shape is rather awkward. This doesn't make the task for any one or two people very easy. In fact, you would likely begin to least think about what reinforcements you could call in to assist. Extra hands could definitely (1) lighten the burden, (2) distribute efforts across the all the awkward areas of the piano, and (3) move it more efficiently.
So the real question I now have is, why do we not address carrying the weight of quality in a similar manner?? It is definitely a huge job, way bigger than any one person can handle alone. It is incredibly awkward, considering how many areas of expertise you would have to master in order to be the most precise at your job. And, the time it takes to execute testing is usually infinite. So why would a tester take on all of the testing by themselves?!
They shouldn't! And with proper planning, don't have to.
A tester can address testing understanding that the quality of the product they are working on is not entirely up to them, the work is far reaching, and can be executed with more efficiency when more people are involved. The way they do is by curating a detailed test plans - an interactive, self organizing process where experience and collaboration govern the team's ability to deliver in the most effective way.
In this workshop we will work together to come up with the master plan! Together we will:
Define Roles and Responsibilities,
Decide on Test Approaches,
Outline Scope,
Create a Text Matrix, and
Configure a Reporting Guidelines
With our time, we will call all hands on deck to work through a test plan, distributing the weight of quality, working together to produce better, stronger plans for our products.
This is a workshop for all members of a team. A chance to work together to understand testing at a planning and execution level.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Executing a Test Plan
  • Delegating Responsibilities
  • Configuring and Outlining Scope
  • Importance of Test Matrices


Speakers
avatar for Ash Coleman

Ash Coleman

Head of Diversity & Inclusion for Credit Karma, Credit Karma
A progressive type, Ash focuses her efforts within technology on bringing awareness to inclusion of women and people of color, especially in the Context Driven Testing and Agile communities. Though technology and inclusion have her heart today, engineering was not her first love... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

1:30pm

Building Evolutionary Architectures (Rebecca Parsons)

Abstract:
With business models and business needs changing so rapidly, an adaptable architecture is critical to allow systems to cope with change. Historically, adaptability has been sought through anticipating the places where a system must be adaptable and through various architectural approaches. However, recent experiences have shown these approaches to be inadequate, at least as currently practiced. This workshop presents some principles of evolutionary architecture that allow systems to respond to change without needing to predict the future. We then describe three approaches that realize these principles and discuss how these approaches support adaptability of systems in an evolutionary way. As an exercise, groups at the tables will take a couple of architectural requirements and decide on appropriate fitness functions for those requirements.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Learn about the underlying principles of evolutionary architecture and will see how various techniques like continuous delivery support creating and evolving the architecture of systems.
  • * Gain experience creating fitness functions and seeing how they support architectural governance and test for architectural features.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Parsons

Rebecca Parsons

CTO, ThoughtWorks
@Dr. Rebecca Parsons is ThoughtWorks' Chief Technology Officer. She has more than 20 years' application development experience, in industries ranging from telecommunications to emergent internet services. Rebecca has published in both language and artificial intelligence publications, served on numerous pro... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

1:30pm

DevOps ICU: Improving DevOps Results by (Correctly) Integrating UX (Debbie Levitt)

Abstract:
Agile methodologies lack the details of how UX fits into software dev projects. Some suggest that a Product Manager describing features is enough for developers, UX should train others to do their specialized jobs, or excluding UX experts solves them being “too siloed” and “not collaborative.” This happens with no other role in software dev; it’s hurting culture, efficiency, and productivity, and creating poor products for customers.
Your customer only sees your UX, not 1000 developers or if you were Agile or Lean. Companies are figuring out that UX specialists and the User-Centered Design process are good investments that more than pay for themselves. Recent highly-publicized UX failures remind us that skimping on the UX process can alienate customers, create negative media attention, and burn millions of dollars.
Learn how the UX process fits into Agile; augments DevOps goals; increases customer satisfaction; and saves time, money, and sanity before developers write a line of code.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Objectives include:
  • 1) Learn that DevOps goals overlap with UX goals.
  • 2) Correct integration of UX experts and tasks saves time and money, increases productivity and efficiency, creates the best idea execution for the target customers, and keeps engineering’s changes and rebuilds to a minimum.
  • 3) Learn how UX specialists conduct user research; design your entire product, app, website, or system; validate it through user testing; iterate to fix flaws; and deliver vetted blueprints so you can build once.
  • 4) How User-Centered Design fits into project timelines and development methodologies including Agile and Lean.


Speakers
avatar for Debbie Levitt

Debbie Levitt

CEO, Ptype - UX Agency and Axure Training
UX strategy and design. Improving DevOps, software dev, and Agile results by correctly integrating UX practitioners and processes.


Monday April 29, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

1:30pm

Distributed Agile Teams Dialed to 11 (Joseph Moore)

Abstract:
Agile methodologies promote and advocate for colocated teams, but many if not most companies employ distributed teams. Can distributed teams turn the Agile dials up to 11 and still have whiteboards, sticky notes, pair programming, TDD, and full-participation agile ceremonies, all without regulating some team members to being second-class citizens of the project?
Yes we can, and yes we do! Joe will walk through the processes, practices, and enabling technologies developed at pioneering agile consultancy Pivotal Labs over the past 13 years. Learn how to incorporate a few occasional "remotes", maintain teams split across regions and timezones, and even how to adopt an "everyone's remote" approach to your distributed agile teams.
Part I of this session is an overview and discussion of the team processes, pro-tip, and pitfalls of several distributed agile team structures; Part II will be a deep dive into supporting technologies, remote pair programming, and a unified solution to all time-zone challenges... kind of.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate that distributed agile teams can be as successful as colocated agile teams
  • Teach attendees the process skills to efficiently run a distributed agile team
  • Teach attendees the tools and technologies that help enable successful distributed agile teams
  • Attendees share out their own pro-tips and pitfalls so everyone can improve, including the speaker.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Moore

Joseph Moore

Principal Software Engineer, Manager, Pivotal
An XP purist since the year 2000, Joe has pair programmed almost 34,000 hours. Joe has been developing and advocating for distributed agile methodologies since going fully remote in 2010, such as remote pair programming, "everyone's remote" distributed team philosophies, and even... Read More →



Monday April 29, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

3:00pm

Afternoon Break
Monday April 29, 2019 3:00pm - 3:20pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

3:20pm

Chaos Development: Removing software as the inhibitor of Agile (Fred George)

Abstract:
You’re starting a new project. You’re using real Agile (finally!). Kickoffs, initial stories, tool selection… the atmosphere is electric. That first iteration is complete; yes, a few kinks, but we’re rolling now. A couple of more iterations flow by before the euphemism “technical debt” is heard. The next couple of iterations are a bit of a struggle. Finally, it looks like the goals may not be achievable. Programmers mumble about faulty designs and changing requirements. Business owners roll their eyes, thinking, “Here we go again…”.
What happened? Practical Agile practices were followed, but were mated with very traditional, inflexible programming styles.
Agile development centers around accommodating change. Stories can be played in business-friendly order. Unanticipated changes can and should be accepted with aplomb. Therefore the design and implementation of the software must also accommodate the uncertain.
Chaos engineering is the vogue term used to describe the design of systems that handle the unexpected. Similarly, software development must accommodate unexpected demands. It needs to focus on chaos development.
In this presentation, we will suggest two distinct approaches to chaos development. The first exploits existing OO languages, but employs a particular style of programming, and can be used for most business problems. The second uses an event bus and highly decoupled services, a technique called asynchronous MicroServices, and is appropriate for addressing fuzzy problems.
For the first style, we will delve into the aspects of the style, particularly its focus on small, tight classes; extensive exploitation of design patterns; and careful monitoring of complexity metrics.
For the second style, we will briefly address the principles at work, and show a brief animation of the type of problem nicely handled by asynchronous MicroServices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The audience should re-examine their engineering practices, and in particular realize that some of their practices are inhibiting successful Agile product development. That realization is soothed by seeing some practical, real-world examples of mitigations.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Fred George

Fred George

Founder, Fred George Consulting
Fred George is an industry consultant, and has been writing code for 50 years in (by his count) over 70 languages. He has delivered projects and products across his career, and in the last decade alone, has worked in the US, India, China, and the UK. He started ThoughtWorks University... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 3:20pm - 4:05pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

3:20pm

Five Underplayed Premises Of TDD (GeePaw Hill)

Abstract:
Test Driven Development seems very much like pure technique, but that's just because technique is easier to point at than what it really is: attitude. When you lead your teams towards TDD, you need to focus on their worldview and let them use that to build technique. GeePaw explores five essential premises leaders need to understand to guide their teams into full-on TDD.
The Money Premise -- We're in this for the money.
The Judgment Premise -- We'll rely on individuals making local decisions.
The Correlation Premise -- Internal quality is productivity.
The Chaining Premise -- We'll test mostly in very small parts.
The Steering Premise -- Tests & testability are first-class design participants.

Learning Outcomes:
  • A basic understanding of the deepest attitudes of the TDD approach.


Speakers
avatar for GeePaw Hill

GeePaw Hill

Coach, GeePawHill.org
GeePaw Hill is an independent software development coach. A geek for nearly 40 years, he has been doing, teaching, and coaching software using the various techniques of agility since the late '90s. He has worked with large teams and tiny ones all over the world, creating everything... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 3:20pm - 4:05pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

3:20pm

No Return: Moving beyond transactions in software and in life (Avdi Grimm)

Abstract:
After 20 years building a successful software development career, my life fell apart. Deconstructing how it happened revealed surprising parallels between how I had approached building a career and family, and how I had designed software. At the root of all I found a pervasive misconception I’ve come to call the “transactional fallacy”: the tensomethingdency to perceive and model processes as if they are transactions.
Join me for an honest, sometimes raw reflection on two decades of software development and life. We’ll examine how personal philosophy impacts software design—and vice-versa. We’ll encounter the Transactional Fallacy, and how it can hinder our attempts to build resilient systems. And we’ll explore how a graceful, process-oriented mindset can lead to both better code and a more joyful life.

Learning Outcomes:
  • _____


Speakers
avatar for Avdi Grimm

Avdi Grimm

Code Minister, Avdi Codes / Shiprise / RubyTapas
In his 20-year software development career, Avdi Grimm has worked on everything from aerospace embedded systems to enterprise web applications. He’s a consulting pair-programmer, the author of several popular Ruby programming books, and a recipient of the Ruby Hero award for service... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 3:20pm - 4:05pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

3:20pm

The Observability Pipeline (Tyler Treat)

Abstract:
The pervasiveness of cloud and containers has led to systems that are much more distributed and dynamic in nature. Highly elastic microservice and serverless architectures mean containers spin up on demand and scale to zero when that demand goes away. In this world, servers are very much cattle, not pets. This shift has exposed deficiencies in some of the tools and practices we used in the world of servers-as-pets. Specifically, there are questions around how we monitor and debug these types of systems at scale. And with the rise of DevOps and product mindset, making data-driven decisions is becoming increasingly important for agile development teams.
In this talk, we discuss a new approach to system monitoring and data collection: the observability pipeline. For organizations that are heavily siloed, this approach can help empower teams when it comes to operating their software. The observability pipeline provides a layer of abstraction that allows you to get operational data such as logs and metrics everywhere it needs to be without impacting developers and the core system. Unlocking this data can also be a huge win for the business with things like auditability, business analytics, and pricing. Lastly, it allows you to change backing data systems easily or test multiple in parallel. With the amount of data and the number of tools modern systems demand these days, we'll see how the observability pipeline becomes just as essential to the operations of a service as the CI/CD pipeline.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What is observability and how does it relate to monitoring?
  • How does operations and DevOps relate to observability?
  • What is the observability pipeline?
  • How can we implement observability and support data-driven decisions for sophisticated microservice-based systems?

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tyler Treat

Tyler Treat

Managing Partner, Real Kinetic
Tyler Treat is a Managing Partner at Real Kinetic where he helps companies build cloud software. At Apcera, Tyler worked on NATS, an open-source, high-performance messaging system for cloud-native applications. Before that, he architected Workiva's microservice messaging platform... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 3:20pm - 4:05pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

4:15pm

Breaking the Monolith: Simplifying complex systems by working backwards to deliver results (Rick Garibay)

Abstract:
If you’re a software developer, chances are you like to innovate. But how often do you really start with a greenfield project?
More often than not, innovation requires either deprecating and/or simplifying/improving existing software to deliver something better or different than what customers were satisfied with before.
Everyone's encountered that dreadful moment when your project requires you to make a change to an existing piece of code. If you’re lucky, you have unit tests that fire green before you make the change. But what do you do when you are not so lucky? Taking it one step further, imagine you've been asked to deprecate one or more components in a highly distributed system that's used by thousands/millions of customers? Maybe you're a domain expert in the system or have limited to no domain expertise. Where do you start? What replaces the existing component(s) and how do you ensure you don't break customers as you replace the old thing with the new?
In this talk, Rick G. Garibay, Principal Engineer @ Amazon will share patterns and techniques he's developed over the last 18 years for embracing change while reducing technical debt. You'll learn proven techniques for deprecating and simplifying existing software while working backwards from your customers to deliver results.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Learn how to determine the complexity of the domain that you are operating and corresponding constraints to guide your architecture and detailed design and build the right feedback loops to learn quickly and fail fast.
  • 2. Learn techniques for identifying existing business capabilities and rationalizing how to factor, deprecate or redistribute concerns within your domain incrementally.
  • 3. Learn real-world patterns and techniques for working more effectively with legacy code including code reading and refactoring techniques, identifying and extracting functional seams for separating concerns and establishing release practices that allow you to test changes in isolation (and yes, sometimes even in production).

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday April 29, 2019 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

4:15pm

Cutting Code Quickly (Llewellyn Falco)

Abstract:
In this guided demo, we are going to look at 3 different techniques that are remarkably powerful in combination to cut through legacy code without having to go thru the bother of reading or understanding it.
The techniques are:
Combination Testing: to get 100% test coverage quickly
Code Coverage as guidance: to help us make decisions about inputs and deletion
Provable Refactorings: to help us change code without having to worry about it.
In combination, these 3 techniques can quickly make impossible tasks trivial.
I will be doing the gilded rose kata. It is encouraged to try it out yourself first: https://github.com/emilybache/GildedRose-Refactoring-Kata

Learning Outcomes:
  • Combination Testing
  • 'Lift If' Refactoring
  • Provable Refactorings

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight a... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

4:15pm

Ghost in the Machine: The Real Consequences of Bias in AI (Nivia Henry, André Henry)

Abstract:
What if the code you’ve written excluded 25% of your customers? Or what if it caused a group of people real-life harm? If you're a responsible engineer, these should be amongst of your biggest fears.
Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning have introduced a new paradigm whereby code can do actual harm. While some of effects may be comically embarrassing - like a smart speaker not accounting for a regional accent; others can be deeply unfair to large groups of people.
Join Nivia (a life-long learner and Sr Engineering Manager at Spotify) and Andre (a polymath and Sr engineer at Venmo), on a journey to explore the world of machine learning and algorithmic bias. We'll explore how algorithms are created, trained and implemented; and more importantly, discuss practical steps to detect, mitigate and eliminate potential biases.

Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:
  • 1. Understand the difference between Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (ML)
  • 2. Understand the types of ML algorithms and their values
  • 3. Understand the ways in which bias is introduced in the creation process
  • 4. Have a sense of the consequences of these biases
  • 5. Have practical means of preventing, mitigating and eliminating such biases

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Nivia Henry

Nivia Henry

Agile Coach Chapter Lead, Spotify
I believe that great people make great things. This philosophy has translated to a 15-year career building and supporting high performing teams, who continuously deliver great software and experiences. My career path has included agile coaching, enterprise agile transformations... Read More →


Monday April 29, 2019 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

4:15pm

Leadership Guide for the Reluctant Leader (David Neal)

Abstract:
Regardless of the technology you know, regardless of the job title you have, you have amazing potential to impact your workplace, community, and beyond.
In this talk, I’ll share a few candid stories of my career failures… I mean… learning opportunities. We’ll start by debunking the myth that leadership == management. Next, we’ll talk about some the attributes, behaviors and skills of good leaders. Last, we’ll cover some practical steps and resources to accelerate your journey.
You’ll walk away with some essential leadership skills I believe anyone can develop, and a good dose of encouragement to be more awesome!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Leadership versus management
  • Negotiation
  • Dealing with difficult people
  • Personalities
  • Empathy
  • Life perspectives

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Neal

David Neal

Developer Advocate, LeanKit
David is a family man, geek, musician, motorcyclist, speaker, and software developer living in North GA. He's currently a Developer Advocate for LeanKit. He's a Microsoft MVP, and runs on a high-octane mixture of caffeine and bacon.


Monday April 29, 2019 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

6:00pm

Sponsor Exhibits
Sponsors are an important element of deliver:Agile 2019. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in Hermitage AB.

Monday April 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom AB

6:00pm

Ice Breaker Reception
Join us for deliver:Agile 2019's Opening Night reception. The evening will be filled with food, drink, and friends! Mix and mingle, chat with new attendees, reconnect with old friends, and be sure to check out the Sponsor exhibit booths to see what's new and exciting in the industry.

Monday April 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom ABC & Foyer
 
Tuesday, April 30
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Tuesday April 30, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

Agile Alliance Lounge Open
Take a break from deliver:Agile2019 action and relax in the Agile Alliance Lounge! As an attendee, you are a member — we invite you to check out information about Alliance initiatives and activities, meet the board members and staff. While you’re there, don’t forget to enjoy a refreshing beverage, pick up some swag, and discover how you and your company can become more involved in the Agile community.

See you there!

Tuesday April 30, 2019 7:30am - 5:30pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

deliver:Collaborate
deliver:Collaborate is deliver:Agile 2019's self-organized gathering and collaboration space. The agenda is fluid, set by you, for you!

The comfortable and welcoming environment is designed to facilitate great collaboration – to help you meet and share ideas and technology with your new found industry friends and colleagues!

Do you want to practice what you are learning in the conference sessions?
Do you want to find new people to pair with on technical solutions or coding exercises?
Do you want to share your ideas or skills with others?
Or maybe you simply need a break and just want to have some fun
If so, come along and join in with impromptu questions, conversations, games, hacks, coding sessions, and more.

The deliver:Collaborate Space is open all day, every day, during the conference, from Sunday through Wednesday!

Tuesday April 30, 2019 7:30am - 5:30pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

8:30am

Enterprise transformation (and you can too) (Donovan Brown)

Abstract:
“That would never work here.” You’ve likely heard this sentiment (or maybe you’ve even said it yourself). Good news: change is possible. Donovan Brown explains how Microsoft's Azure DevOps (formerly Visual Studio Team System) went from a three-year waterfall delivery cycle to three-week iterations and open sourced the Azure DevOps task library and the Git Virtual File System.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Change is possible


Speakers
avatar for Donovan Brown

Donovan Brown

Principal DevOps Manager, Microsoft
Meet The Man in the Black Shirt. Donovan Brown is a Principal DevOps Manager on Microsoft's Cloud Developer Advocacy team. Why is DevOps one of the hottest topics? Because it hurts the most. Luckily, Donovan's unofficial tagline is #RubDevOpsOnIt and he's here to make it all better. Before joining Microsoft, Donovan spent seven years as a Process Consultant and a Certified Scrum Master. Developer Tools are his thing. Donovan has traveled the globe helping companies in the U.S., Canada, India, Germany, and the UK develop solutions... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Hermitage Ballroom

10:00am

Morning Break
Tuesday April 30, 2019 10:00am - 10:20am
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

10:20am

17th Century Shipbuilding And Your Failed Software Project (Pete Cheslock)

Abstract:
Around 4:00 PM on August 10, 1628 the warship Vasa set sail in Stockholm harbor on its maiden voyage as the newest ship in the Royal Swedish Navy. After sailing about 1300 meters, a light gust of wind caused the Vasa to heel over on its side. Water poured in through the gun portals and the ship sank with a loss of 53 lives.
The fundamental reason the Vasa sank is, of course, that the ship was unstable. The reasons that the Vasa was constructed to be unstable, and launched when known to be unstable, are numerous and varied. The lessons to be learned are as relevant to our modern-day attempts to build large, complex systems as they were to the art and craft of building warships in 1628.
We'll talk about why things fail - and how the failure of the Vasa often mimics the failure of large software engineering projects.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What we can learn from our past to improve how we build and deliver software.


Speakers
avatar for Pete Cheslock

Pete Cheslock

VP, Products, CHAOSSEARCH



Tuesday April 30, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom D

10:20am

Achieving Agility w/ APIs at Chick-fil-A (Brian Chambers)

Abstract:
At Chick-fil-A, we are laser-focused on scaling our technology infrastructure and processes while maintaining a high degree of business agility so that we can take advantage of unexpected opportunities. This is being done in our "real world": the non-pristine environment of a busy, high-functioning enterprise scattered with both modern and legacy systems.
In this session, you will learn about Chick-fil-A’s API strategy and how it is being employed to create business agilityFirst, you will hear about what Chick-fil-A is doing with APIs across functional teams, engineering teams, and everything in between. You will learn more about our “why”, which will likely parallel your own. Then we’ll dive into the details about how we have approached the problem technically and organizationally. When you walk out the door you will have a complete understanding of our approach, and will be ready to build your own.

Learning Outcomes:
  • I want to prepare the audience to sell and execute on a strategy similiar to ours that will enable their business to be ready to scale and take advantage of unexpected opportunities as they arise.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Brian Chambers

Brian Chambers

Lead Enterprise Architect and Chief Technologist, Chick-fil-A
Brian Chambers is the Lead Enterprise Architect and Chief Technologist for Chick-fil-A, Inc., a quick-service restaurant chain with roughly 2200 locations based in Atlanta, GA. Brian’s team identifies strategic and differentiating technology opportunities, develops platforms and... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom C

10:20am

Agile Machine Learning, In Production (Kishau Rogers)

Abstract:
The future of software is being driven by intelligent applications. By the year 2020, more than 85% of customer-to-business interactions will be carried out without humans (Gartner). 81% of IT leaders are already investing or plan to invest in artificial technology solutions.
Time Study is a startup on a mission to eliminate timesheets using machine learning, mobile technology, and data science. In regards to rapid development, rapid response feedback loops, and continuous improvement, ML projects are well suited for Agile methodologies. However, there are some considerations for successfully using AI and machine learning for agile development, such as:
  1. Sprint Planning - Breakdown and define agile experiments to support rapid iteration and deliver incremental value.
  2. Rapid Iteration - Create data-driven feedback loops for research and production environments
  3. Agile Team Roles - Expand development team roles to include engineers, data scientists as well as Subject Matter Experts
In this session, we will discuss best practices for successfully integrating agile development cycles with machine learning workflows.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Best practices for successfully integrating agile development cycles with machine learning workflows, including considerations for:
  • 1. Sprint Planning - Breakdown and define agile experiments to support rapid iteration and deliver incremental value.
  • 2. Rapid Iteration - Create data-driven feedback loops for research and production environments
  • 3. Agile Team Roles - Expand development team roles to include engineers, data scientists as well as Subject Matter Experts

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday April 30, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom E

10:20am

No Microservice Is An Island (Michele Titolo)

Abstract:
You don't deploy a single microservice. The journey to microservice architecture involves more than how code is written or applications are packaged. It's about creating an interconnected ecosystem that keeps things running. Infrastructure and tools have only grown in importance as microservices have emerged as a dominant architecture pattern. Deploying, scaling, and monitoring are more important for microservices than they ever were before. Attendees will leave this session knowing the basic infrastructure and tooling needs for microservices to be successful.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the tooling and infrastructure needed to create a reliable microservices ecosystem.

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday April 30, 2019 10:20am - 11:05am
Hermitage Ballroom F

11:15am

Delivery Pipelines as a First Class Citizen (Cora Iberkleid)

Abstract:
Software delivery is a key capability that is often treated as an afterthought, resulting in a rigid, fragile, and inefficient process that is difficult to maintain and evolve and that can even limit developer agility. In this talk, we will explore the burgeoning topics of delivery as code, distributed ownership of jobs/stages, and the importance of testing the pipeline itself. These practices aim to make pipelines easier to create and manage over time and at scale. We will also cover best practices to incorporate into our delivery pipelines so that developers can change and test applications more frequently and effectively, positioning us to produce better software faster.

Learning Outcomes:
  • An appreciation for the value that some key best practices can provide for developer agility.
  • An understanding of the recent hot topic of software defined delivery, and some of the nuances in different approaches.

Attachments:

Speakers
CI

Cora Iberkleid

Pivotal
Cora Iberkleid is an Advisory Cloud Application and Platform Architect at Pivotal, where she helps enterprises leverage modern technologies like Pivotal Cloud Foundry, Spring Boot, and Spring Cloud in order to deliver better quality software faster. Prior to joining Pivotal, she spent... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

11:15am

Lightning Talks Session #2 (Richard Seroter)

Abstract:
Lighting Talk

Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers
avatar for Richard Seroter

Richard Seroter

Senior Director of Product, Pivotal
Richard Seroter is a Senior Director of Product at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also a Microsoft MVP for cloud, Pluralsight trainer, lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, frequent public speaker, and author of multiple... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

11:15am

Making a video game on the bus: a story of rapid iteration (Qristy Overton)

Abstract:
Portland, 6PM: board the bus for Seattle to give a talk about making video games. Realize that I need to write a tutorial game. Open laptop, stare at cursor.
Seattle, 9PM: Get off the bus with a shiny new game.
This session will walk through how I got from Portland and Seattle--the steps to making a small game in a small timeframe and what made it possible.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the high-level steps involved in making a video game
  • Recognize analogous ways they could change their technologies or culture to facilitate rapid iteration


Speakers

Tuesday April 30, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

11:15am

Patterns of Instantiation (David Bernstein)

Abstract:
One key difference between writing object-oriented software and writing procedural software is the notion of object construction. Objects must be instantiated before they can be used. This is much more than a technical detail, it is at the very core of OO's usefulness.
By separating an object’s construction from its usage, we can encapsulate an object’s type during construction, so that it can be used without revealing its type. This gives an object testability, extensibility, and modularity. Building a program's object graph separate from using those objects simplifies software construction and reduces dependencies so that code is simpler to work with.
One key distinction—and therefore opportunity—of object-oriented programming over procedural programming is that objects have two phases in their lifecycle: creation and use. By separating these two phases so that certain kinds of tasks are done when objects are created, and other kinds of tasks are done later during usage, we can build software that’s more modular and extensible.
In this session, we’ll explore how you can leverage object instantiation to build decoupled, extensible and maintainable systems. We’ll cover several common antipatterns in instantiation along with replacement patterns that drop the cost of ownership for software built in object-oriented languages such as Java, C Sharp, C++, etc.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Leverage object instantiation to write more decoupled and testable code
  • Learn how to use the object-oriented model to build maintainable software
  • Recognize instantiation anti-patterns that make code harder to extend
  • Apply instantiation patterns that improve testability and extensibility
  • Know when to use factories and how to construct them efficiently
  • Encapsulate construction to improve an object’s testability and extensibility

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Bernstein

David Bernstein

Consultant, To Be Agile
David Scott Bernstein is the author of the new book _Beyond Legacy Code: Nine Practices to Extend the Life (and Value) of Your Software._ It’s an insider’s view of the software industry drawn from his decades of hands-on experience as a software developer, trainer, and consultant... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

12:00pm

Sponsor Exhibits
Sponsors are an important element of deliver:Agile 2019. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in Hermitage AB.

Tuesday April 30, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom AB

12:00pm

Lunch
Tuesday April 30, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Hermitage Ballroom AB

1:30pm

Crack Open Innovation with Customer Journeys (April Jefferson)

Abstract:
Discover insights that can be transformed into opportunities ripe for innovation with our Customer Journey Mapping workshop. When user’s often desire seamless experiences across mobile, online and offline platforms, mapping with empathy can help you understand and maximize effectiveness of every touch-point. You will see the big picture holistically and learn how to tell the story of common pain points along the journey and harness the power of visually storytelling the customer experience.

Learning Outcomes:
  • When to use the tool, who to engage, and how to make it a living document as your product evolves
  • To discover what is customer visible value
  • To empathize with your user, understanding how they experience your product or service
  • To find opportunities to better engage with your customers by identifying the gap between the current and desired experience
  • To prioritize at high level based on the greatest value delivered


Speakers
avatar for April Jefferson

April Jefferson

President and Owner, April Jefferson Corp.
April Jefferson is an Agile transformation consultant and organizational change coach. She is passionate about empowering others to foster social change and uses Agile, Lean, UX, design thinking and open space to create awesome solutions and positive organizational cultures. She helps... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

1:30pm

DevOps Culture Immersion (with Lego and Chocolate) (Dana Pylayeva)

Abstract:
Organisations today can no longer afford to deliver new features to their respective markets once a year or even once a quarter. In the attempt to catch up with the competition, they jump onto DevOps journey starting with the "How" and losing the sight of "Why" and "What".
Join this gamified simulation workshop to gain a solid understanding of foundational principles of the DevOps culture. Experience the benefits of DevOps transformation even before initiating one in your enterprise!
Ideally designed for organisations that are
• Evaluating their approach to DevOps transformation
• Making their first steps in adopting DevOps practices
• Noticing the gaps left by “automation only” approach to DevOps.
This course
• Is based on real-life examples from medium to large size organizations
• includes the latest findings from the State of DevOps report 2018
• delivers key ideas from “The Phoenix Project” by Gene Kim
• facilitates a number of debriefings to draw parallels between the issues highlighted in the simulation and some of the similar issues the learners may have in their organisations (impact on business, segregation of duty, change management, Job security and even fear-based culture)
Through this powerful role-based simulation with LEGO and Chocolate, participants experience the benefits of cross-training, learn to eliminate silos, adopt systems thinking and gain valuable insights that can be immediately applied in their organisations.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the benefits of the business and IT alignment with DevOps.
  • Identify the principles and practices including: Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery, testing, “shift left” on security, “one piece flow” and the Three Ways of DevOps.
  • Relate DevOps to Agile, Lean and Theory of Constraints.
  • Discuss the critical role of the safety culture in enabling Continual Experimentation and Learning at the level of an organisation.
  • Explain the changes DevOps brings to a Segregation of Duty, Audit requirements, CAB, risk management etc.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dana Pylayeva

Dana Pylayeva

Agile Coach and Founder at Agile Play Consulting, LLC, Agile Play Consulting
In her 16 years of industry experience Dana has been exposed to different areas of IT as a Java Developer, an Architect, a DBA Manager, a Scrum Master and an Agile Coach. Every role she has had in her career has given her an opportunity to apply her passion for agile principles and... Read More →



Tuesday April 30, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

1:30pm

Test-First from the Product Owner to the Dev Team to Dev Ops (Al Shalloway)

Abstract:
Test-First is a larger umbrella than many think. It ranges from more than Acceptance Test-Driven Development and Unit Testing. Done properly, it starts with product management and goes through value realization. This talk will not discuss all of test-first but will center on how Test-First affects the developer – from a requirements point of view to development to release. It will discuss how test-first with the product owner sets the stage for good design as a side-affect of getting clarity on requirements. This “side-effect” is something called out in design patterns, but not often discussed. The talk will also discuss on how the use of test-first needs to focus on value realization, not merely writing the code. The talk concludes by discussing the relationship of developers to ops and other post-production roles in the organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • how test-first is useful virtually throughout the value stream
  • how design patterns espouse a test-first mind set
  • the relationship between the code quality of "testability" relates to quality design


Speakers
avatar for Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway

CEO, Net Objectives
Founder and CEO of Net Objectives.Co-founder of Lean-Kanban University (no longer affiliated). SPC Trainer. Co-author of 4 books on Lean, Scrum, Design Patterns and Agile Design. Happy to talk to anyone who wants a free consult. Also, are looking for folks who'd like to work with... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

1:30pm

The Ultimate Metric (Janelle Klein)

Abstract:
Since the dawn of software development, we've struggled with a huge disconnect between the management world and the engineering world. We try to explain our problems in terms of "technical debt", but somehow the message seems to get lost in translation, and we drive our projects into the ground, over and over again.
What if we could detect the earliest indicators of a project going off the rails, and had data to convince management to take action? What if we could bridge this communication gap once and for all?
In this session, we'll focus on a key paradigm shift for how we can measure the human factors in software development, and translate the "friction" we experience into explicit risk models for project decision-making.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn see the challenges of software development through a new paradigm, with new strategies for keeping a project off the rails.

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday April 30, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

3:00pm

Afternoon Break
Tuesday April 30, 2019 3:00pm - 3:20pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

3:20pm

Abuser Stories: Thinking Like the Bad Guy to Reduce Software Vulnerabilities (Judy Neher)

Abstract:
Abuser stories give us a way to view our systems from our enemies perspective. Think "user stories" through the bad guy's lens.
Abuser stories capture potential vulnerabilities in software systems, using the standard user story format. While user stories are written from a user perspective, abuser stories are written from an enemy or attacker's perspective and describe the enemy's mal-intent and motivation.
The session will look at the concept of Abuser Stories in-depth, with hands-on exercises to create and practice your own.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How seemingly benign functional user stories can create vulnerabilities in our software, leaving lots of opportunity for our enemies to take advantage of our weaknesses.
  • How to use the concept of abuser stories to shed some light on where these vulnerabilities can be introduced.
  • How to craft a good abuser story.
  • How to craft refutation criteria so that we can determine that the attack depicted by the abuser story is not possible.
  • How to estimate and rank abuser stories.


Speakers
avatar for Judy Neher

Judy Neher

President/CEO, Celerity Technical Services, Inc.
Passionate about building highly collaborative, high performing teams.


Tuesday April 30, 2019 3:20pm - 4:50pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

3:20pm

Kube Your Enthusiasm (Paul Czarkowski, Tyler Britten)

Abstract:
Part talk, part demo, part live coding. Paul and Tyler from Pivotal will take the audience through the basics of Kubernetes and then turn to the audience to go down a Kube Your Own Adventure exploration of a number of different Kubernetes related topics.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to build a docker image, run that docker image, run it in Kubernetes, Write and Run a Helm chart, you name it!


Speakers
avatar for Paul Czarkowski

Paul Czarkowski

Systems Engineer, Pivotal
Paul Czarkowski is a recovering Systems Administrator who has run infrastructure for longer than he cares to admit. After cutting his teeth in the ISP and Gaming industries Paul changed his focus to using (and contributing to) Open Source Software to improve the Operability of complex... Read More →
avatar for Tyler Britten

Tyler Britten

Sr Principal Technologist, Pivotal
Tyler has spent the last 18 years working with cloud, virtualization, and infrastructure technologies. Prior to joining Pivotal, Tyler worked in technical marketing and developer advocacy roles for Red Hat, IBM, and EMC. He also worked as a consultant and a network engineer for a... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 3:20pm - 4:50pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

3:20pm

Measuring the Business Impact of Agile Technical Practices (Jason Tice)

Abstract:
Are you in an organization where management or leadership challenges the adoption of agile technical practices by questioning the true business value such practices provide?
Perhaps you’ve heard – “pair programming – why on earth would we pay two people to work on the same code at the same time – that’s not productive” or “why should we spend time to automate our deployment pipeline when our release process only takes about 15 minutes to run manually – we can release every day if we want to” or even better “why do we have to pay everyone overtime for being on-call during after-hours Sev1 incidents, when 90% of the time the DBAs are the root cause of Sev1 problems so everyone else gets paid overtime to sit on the bridge and wait for DBAs to fix the problem”.
If any of this sounds familiar, chances are you are working in an organization that has yet to define and communicate the impacts of adopting agile technical practices using business metrics. While technical metrics such as code complexity, test coverage, defect density, build failure rate, crash rate and many more are useful metrics to measure technical improvements by adopting agile technical practices, simply reporting these metrics to management and leadership does not adequately convey the true business value of agile technical practices.
The true business value of agile technical practices is best communicated when agile technical metrics are linked to business metrics such as mean time to resolution (MTTR), conversion rate per session or increased customer engagement / activity.
In this interactive workshop, participants will explore how to improve measuring the business impact of agile technical practices by working in small groups to first identify & prioritize technical metrics for specific technical scenarios. Participants will then be challenged to link technical metrics to business metrics to convey business impacts supported by increased adoption of agile technical practices.
All participants will leave the session having created a sample dashboard that links technical metrics to business metrics so as to demonstrate the true business value of agile technical practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will review the most common technical metrics used to measure the technical improvements achieved by adopting agile technical practices.
  • Participants will review recommended business metrics that are commonly used to demonstrate the true business value of adopting agile technical practices.
  • Participants will experience a collaboration framework that guides the selection of both technical and business metrics to assess the technical improvement and business impacts of addressing a specific technical challenge.
  • Participants will gain insights on how to measure the technical & business impacts of specific scenarios by working through a specific scenario themselves, and then having an opportunity to see what metrics other groups selected to measure other scenarios.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jason Tice

Jason Tice

Vice President, Asyncrhony
Jason Tice has over 15 years of experience using collaborative activities and games to help organizations, their teams and their customers achieve clarity and alignment to enable high performance. More recently, Jason has led efforts to adapt collaboration frameworks familiar to agile... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 3:20pm - 4:50pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

3:20pm

Safeguarding - Using Your Bugs to Prevent Bugs and Fund Technical Debt Fixes (Arlo Belshee)

Abstract:
Do you have that piece of code that grows bugs every time you try to change it? Yet, do you find it difficult to fund a repair? Fixing it will take a project, and that one just never makes it to the top of the queue. Or do you spend a lot of time finding others' bugs? Or do others around you always take the safe path, even when there's a better option? Do you get interrupted every sprint by a couple bugs, and so miss the sprint goal?
Safeguarding addresses all of these and more.
Safeguarding is a simple, 22-minute practice that allows you to find, fund, and then execute real changes to your process and product. Fix technical debt this sprint. And next sprint. And the one after. Without slipping features. Fix process debt. Fix psychological safety issues.
In this workshop, you will safeguard a real problem that you are experiencing right now. You'll learn how to facilitate yourself and your team through safeguarding. And you'll learn how to sell this practice to your product owners and managers.
My goal is simple: I want you to go home after the conference and start actually fixing technical debt, start actually preventing bugs. By this time next year, I want you to have less than 5% of your current number of bugs.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Can define good remediations, on the basis of a bug, to prevent future bugs.
  • Understand hazards and know how to look for them.
  • Understand when to safeguard to get the best results.
  • Ready to start safeguarding when they get home.


Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Team Craftsman, Legacy Code Mender, and Rabblerouser, Tableau Software
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant... Read More →


Tuesday April 30, 2019 3:20pm - 4:50pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

6:00pm

deliver:Agile Conference Party
Get ready to experience Nashville in a totally new way. The Food Truck craze has hit Nashville, and hit it hard. Music City’s food trucks offer an eclectic mix of diverse cuisine to satisfy everyone’s culinary tastes, with many trucks featuring fresh local food and of course a must have, Nashville music Entertainment!

Tuesday April 30, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer, Outside Entrance
 
Wednesday, May 1
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Wednesday May 1, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

Agile Alliance Lounge Open
Take a break from deliver:Agile2019 action and relax in the Agile Alliance Lounge! As an attendee, you are a member — we invite you to check out information about Alliance initiatives and activities, meet the board members and staff. While you’re there, don’t forget to enjoy a refreshing beverage, pick up some swag, and discover how you and your company can become more involved in the Agile community.

See you there!

Wednesday May 1, 2019 7:30am - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

deliver:Collaborate
deliver:Collaborate is deliver:Agile 2019's self-organized gathering and collaboration space. The agenda is fluid, set by you, for you!

The comfortable and welcoming environment is designed to facilitate great collaboration – to help you meet and share ideas and technology with your new found industry friends and colleagues!

Do you want to practice what you are learning in the conference sessions?
Do you want to find new people to pair with on technical solutions or coding exercises?
Do you want to share your ideas or skills with others?
Or maybe you simply need a break and just want to have some fun
If so, come along and join in with impromptu questions, conversations, games, hacks, coding sessions, and more.

The deliver:Collaborate Space is open all day, every day, during the conference, from Sunday through Wednesday!

Wednesday May 1, 2019 7:30am - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

7:30am

8:30am

Applying the Serverless Mindset to Any Tech Stack (Ben Kehoe)

Abstract:
Serverless is a nebulous buzzword, and is often equated with Functions as a Service (FaaS) platforms like AWS Lambda. However, serverless is about something deeper, and in the end is not even about particular technologies. Serverless is, instead, a mindset: make technology decisions that further your ability to focus on what differentiates you as a business. This talk will dive into the serverless mindset, how it relates to serverless technologies, and show that it can serve as a compass to guide decision-making even in organizations that are entirely on-prem.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn that serverless is an approach to technology that drives focus on business value and differentiation, and that the purest application of this approach is to use fully managed public cloud services, but that the approach can be applied for any tech stack.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ben Kehoe

Ben Kehoe

Cloud Robotics Research Scientist, iRobot
Ben Kehoe is a Cloud Robotics Research Scientist at iRobot and an AWS Serverless Hero. Cloud Robotics—using the internet to enable robots to do more and better things—is an area of IoT involving computation in the cloud and at the edge, Big Data, and machine learning. Approaching... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 8:30am - 9:15am
Hermitage Ballroom D

8:30am

Ready Tester One? Go! (Melissa Eaden)

Abstract:
Based on my blog post, “Ready Tester One? Go!" I take a look at my own career development and the need to understand a probable career development path for testers in software development. By using and identifying with gaming techniques such as “leveling”, testers are encouraged to find where they think they are in their career growth and then find out how they should continue along the “tester” path and what that might look like as you gain levels. Includes a nifty character sheet people can use to chart their own learning path!
Purpose of Talk:
Most companies lack an outline of career growth and development for testers. They expect testers to find their own way or move either into development or project management. The industry needs testers, but doesn’t understand how to help. This talk seeks to lay a foundation or a framework for testers to measure career growth and have a general path for development.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Desire to set a learning path for their career growth
  • Interested in games and gaming and want to look for ways to enjoy both
  • Creating a character sheet out of personal resume
  • Tips on how to learn new skills
  • Tips on looking for opportunities to learn skills

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday May 1, 2019 8:30am - 9:15am
Hermitage Ballroom E

8:30am

Scaling Agile Delivery (James Shore)

Abstract:
When multiple teams work on the same product or set of products, how can those teams work together effectively? How do we create a sustainable codebase, minimize cross-team dependencies, and divide up the work? Scaling isn't just a management problem; it's a technical problem too.
In this session, James Shore will share ideas and strategies based on his experiences helping organizations with multi-team products. He'll share concrete techniques and look back at what's worked, what hasn't, and the context needed for each idea to be successful.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to minimize cross-team dependencies
  • How to coordinate between multiple teams
  • How to handle cross-cutting concerns such as platform development
  • Understanding the role of architecture

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for James Shore

James Shore

Consultant, Titanium I.T. LLC
James Shore teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He is a recipient of the Agile Alliance's Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile Practice, co-author of /The Art of Agile Development/, and co-creator of the Agile Fluency™ Model. You can find his essays... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 8:30am - 9:15am
Hermitage Ballroom C

8:30am

Ten reasons BDD won’t save your development process (plus a couple of ways it might help) (Steve Tooke)

Abstract:
You'd think, as an owner of Cucumber Ltd, I would be shouting from the hilltops about how Behaviour Driven Development can save your development process, right?
Actually no.
There are no silver bullets, and BDD is no exception - it is at its best when used as part of a broad set of practices within a particular culture.
Using anonymized examples from the real world, we will look at ten anti-patterns where BDD on it's own almost certainly won't save the day.
We will also take a look at some of the surprising ways BDD - and in particular Example mapping - CAN help, especially from a social and cognitive perspective.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - You will understand the symbiotic relationship BDD has with other development practices
  • - You will begin to identify when using BDD might not be the first thing to look at
  • - You will be able to list some common impediments to using BDD
  • - You will begin to see some of the reasons BDD - and in particular Example Mapping - might help with cognitive load and collaboration


Speakers

Wednesday May 1, 2019 8:30am - 9:15am
Hermitage Ballroom F

9:25am

Do Programming Languages have Personalities? (Rob Myers)

Abstract:
In his long journey from FORTRAN to Ruby, Rob has encountered many programming languages. Having written the same code in many languages for his technical classes, he may be uniquely positioned to see their similarities and differences; their unique strengths and weaknesses. But he has rarely chosen a favorite or succumbed to the thrill of "language wars." Instead, he's found unique and interesting innovations, and at least a few things to appreciate, in each language. Whether you're considering picking up a new language, or trying to rekindle your love for Java, you'll explore some interesting details, comparisons, and history of many programming languages in common use today. Such as the original intent of the Java interface keyword, the C# internal keyword, multiple inheritance in C++...and in Ruby. The promise of Java, and of the .Net languages. The advantages of strong types and compilers. The advantages of duck typing and no compilers (Ruby, JavaScript). And rather than try to answer "When would I choose one over the other?" we'll instead explore ways to learn a new language, and not just its syntax, but its personality: what are its strengths, and weaknesses? Instead of "Is this my new favorite?" you'll be able to ask "Will we get along? Will we be able to work together to get stuff done?"

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Develop an appreciation for many of the languages in common use today.
  • * Learn to tolerate an older or "less fun" language by working with it in the best way possible.
  • * Learn why certain language design choices were made, and why they made sense at the time.
  • * Learn why TDD can help us learn a new language, and help to explore its strengths and pitfalls safely while becoming immediately productive.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Myers

Rob Myers

Principal Agile Instructor & Coach, Agile for All
Rob Myers has over 30 years of professional experience in software development, and has been coaching teams on TDD, Scrum, Lean, Agile, and XP practices since 1998. He has been delivering Agile-related talks and courses since 2002. His courses are always a blend of fun and practical... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 9:25am - 10:10am
Hermitage Ballroom C

9:25am

Lightning Talks Session #3 (Richard Seroter)

Abstract:
Lightning Talk

Learning Outcomes:
  • NA


Speakers
avatar for Richard Seroter

Richard Seroter

Senior Director of Product, Pivotal
Richard Seroter is a Senior Director of Product at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also a Microsoft MVP for cloud, Pluralsight trainer, lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, frequent public speaker, and author of multiple... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 9:25am - 10:10am
Hermitage Ballroom E

9:25am

Live Site Culture & Site Reliability - Defeating the Scaling Unicorns (Martin Hinshelwood)

Abstract:
Succeeding at delivering large scale systems gets harder once you get into production and delighting your customers is not just a matter of delivering new features. Microsoft has gone from a few deployments a year to over 80k deployments a day in the space of just a few years. To achieve this they have had to change not only how they build software, but how they monitor it in production. We will cover how Microsoft now use Live Site Culture & Site Reliability to build quality and transparency and build customer trust, diagnose with customer experience telemetry, respond and learn faster, automation enables scale, & get to root cause and continually improve.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn many posible practices that would help them deliver more and take learnings from how Microsoft failed.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Martin Hinshelwood

Martin Hinshelwood

DevOps & Agile Consultant, naked Agility Limited
Martin Hinshelwood believes that every company deserves high-quality software delivered on a regular cadence that meets its customer’s needs. His goal is to help you reduce your cycle time, improve your time to market, and minimise any organisational friction in achieving your goals... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 9:25am - 10:10am
Hermitage Ballroom F

9:25am

Testing Microservices from Development to Production (Daniel Bryant)

Abstract:
Testing microservices is challenging. Dividing a system into components naturally creates inter-service dependencies, and each service has its own performance and fault-tolerance characteristics that need to be validated during development, the QA process, and continually in production. Join Daniel Bryant to learn about the theory, techniques and practices needed to overcome this challenge.

Learning Outcomes:
  • – Introduction to the challenges of testing distributed microservice systems
  • – Learn tactics for isolating tests within a complex microservice ecosystem
  • – Whistle stop tour of consumer-driven contract testing and API simulation
  • – Implementing fault-injection testing to validate nonfunctional requirements in development and QA
  • – An introduction and discussion of the need for continually validating microservice systems running in production, both through observability and practices like chaos engineering


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Bryant

Daniel Bryant

Product Architect, Datawire
Daniel Bryant works as an Independent Technical Consultant and Product Architect at Datawire. His technical expertise focuses on ‘DevOps’ tooling, cloud/container platforms, and microservice implementations. Daniel is a Java Champion, and contributes to several open source projects... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 9:25am - 10:10am
Hermitage Ballroom D

10:00am

Morning Break
Wednesday May 1, 2019 10:00am - 10:20am
Hermitage Ballroom Foyer

10:30am

Overcoming dys-functional programming. Leverage & transcend years of OO know-how with FP. (Declan Whelan, Shawn Button)

Abstract:
Interest in Functional Programming has exploded in recent years. If you are an experienced OO developer, your design techniques and coding practices can easily get in the way of FP success.I t certainly did for us! Fortunately, there are way to leverage what you already know.
Join Declan and Shawn in this interactive session. Explore the joys and challenges of moving from Object Oriented programming to Functional Programming.

Learning Outcomes:
  • principles and practices that work with both FP and OO
  • learning path to becoming a better FP developer
  • things to watch out for as an OO developer when applying FP
  • refactoring techniques to move OO code to an FP style

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Declan Whelan

Declan Whelan

Leanintuit
Helping organizations improve value steams and their organizational structure.
avatar for Shawn Button

Shawn Button

Agile Coach, Leanintuit
An expert in agile development practices, Shawn Button is an agile/lean coach with the proven ability to help individuals, teams, and enterprises adopt better ways of working. Shawn believes that any team can do great things—with the right leadership, mentorship, and support. His... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

10:30am

Practical Refactoring: Simple Steps to Cleaner Code (Woody Zuill)

Abstract:
The goal: Clean Code That Works, and getting there is half the fun. Working with a legacy mess can be frustrating, boring, dangerous, and time-consuming. When FIBS occur (FIBs = Fixes that Introduce Bugs) you often enter an endless Test and Fix cycle that can quickly escalate into a nightmare. I've been there, you've been there. How do we return to pleasant dreams?
In this code-centric mini workshop we'll look at ways to introduce sanity and calmness into the process of maintaining and improving buggy, poorly written, poorly designed code. Few slides, mostly code. I've been fighting the good fight for a long time and we are going to show you how to turn any project around and have fun doing it. It is our opinion that we can fix and enhance any code.
We'll be working on an example project and learn the steps of making changes to code in tiny steps. We'll find ways to clean up the most common problems of duplication, clutter, and complexity.
Our approach will have us using Solo or Pair, and maybe Mob Programming to do exercises and work with others as we experiment with many simple techniques that combine together to make a big impact on the quality and cleanliness of our code.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The basic goal is to learn enough about refactoring in baby steps so you can begin doing this immediately. We'll be covering a number of basic refactoring techniques that provide a wide range of easy to implement improvements, and learn how to identify some common code "smells" (symptoms of potential problems)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Independent Agile Guide, Independent Agile Guide
I've been a software developer for 36+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Independent Agile Guide. I worked with the original "Mob Programming" team at Hunter Industries, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

10:30am

Strangle Your Legacy Code (Amitai Schleier, Markus Silpala)

Abstract:
Given an ancient codebase that makes refactoring risky and expensive, how do you clear a path to continued delivery? The old wisdom says the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, and the next best time is today. But if you already have a gnarled old source tree, preserve your software investment by planting a Strangler: a pattern for reaping continuous value from your existing system while growing new functionality alongside it.
We'll take a quick look at a Strangler, demonstrate the basics of Mob Programming, then split into small groups to test-drive new features into the system. You'll leave with a powerful strategy for extending the useful life of working, valuable software -- especially when it's hard to change -- and with a free bonus development practice to accelerate your team's learning. For a limited time only!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Form and function of the Strangler pattern
  • Contexts where it may be useful
  • Coding in a real Strangler
  • Challenges of putting the pattern into practice


Speakers
avatar for Amitai Schleier

Amitai Schleier

Software Development Coach, Latent Agility
Amitai Schleier (@schmonz) is a software development coach, legacy code wrestler, non-award-winning musician, and award-winning bad poet. He publishes fixed-length micropodcasts at Agile in 3 Minutes, writes variable-length articles at schmonz.com, and contributes code and direction... Read More →
avatar for Markus Silpala

Markus Silpala

Thinker, Doer, and Maker (TDM), Silpala Software
I write code. I talk to people. I make software with people, and for people.


Wednesday May 1, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

10:30am

The Extreme Agility of Serverless Architectures (Joseph Emison)

Abstract:
Most of the writing and examples on serverless application architectures either lack enough detail to understand exactly why serverless has any real advantages over other methods of building software, or is far too in-the-weeds to understand how the particular discussion would be better than an alternate implementation that was not serverless. In this workshop, I will defines and explains how serverless is different from other application architectures, explaining the philosophies and benefits of what good serverless architectures deliver. Then, I will take the participants through each of four different application architectures, taking the time for everyone to pull the git repos and build and run the code, walking through more of the details of the code, and leaving everyone with very concrete examples of the substantial agile benefits of good serverless architectures.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - What serverless means
  • - What good serverless architectures look like
  • - Why serverless architectures deliver better agility to organizations than traditional application architectures

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Emison

Joseph Emison

CTO, Branch


Wednesday May 1, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

12:00pm

Sponsor Exhibits
Sponsors are an important element of deliver:Agile 2019. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in Hermitage AB.

Wednesday May 1, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom AB

12:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday May 1, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Hermitage Ballroom AB

1:30pm

Flow and Agile: The event-driven future for modern software (James Urquhart)

Abstract:
Event-driven architectures have been around for a long time, but new trends and innovations in "serverless" computing, data streaming, and Agile practices have created the ground for an evolutionary step that will have significant impact on the way we design and build software over the next decade or more. Much like APIs drove a revolution in public services for RPC, REST, and similar "pull" use cases across organization boundaries, the market now promises to similarly define standard mechanisms to enable "push" notifications of discrete data and activities. This practice, which we call Flow, will drive a revolution in interconnectivity similar to what we saw with HTML and REST.
Agile is central to the success of these mechanisms, and is one of the key reasons why this will happen sooner rather than later. The ability to adapt quickly to customer needs, combined with the ability to react quickly to new and changing event sources, is required to make event-driven practices work. In this talk, James Urquhart will describe the changes on our horizon, discuss existing architectures, mechanisms and organizations that are leading the way, and talk specifically about how Agile teams are well prepared to both drive and benefit from Flow systems. The talk is targeted at technology, development, and product leaders who wish to understand how Flow fits into their architecture portfolio.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Get a clear definition of what Flow is, who is pioneering Flow approaches, and specific technologies and open source initiatives that are driving the future.


Speakers
avatar for James Urquhart

James Urquhart

Global Field CTO, Pivotal
James Urquhart is a Global Field CTO at Pivotal Cloud Foundry. Named one of the ten most influential people in cloud computing by both the MIT Technology Review and the Huffington Post, and a former contributing author to GigaOm and CNET, Mr. Urquhart is a technologist and executive... Read More →



Wednesday May 1, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Hermitage Ballroom F

1:30pm

Free As In Puppies: Toward a better build vs. buy understanding (Heidi Waterhouse)

Abstract:
A free puppy, like a white elephant, is a gift that takes a lot of time, energy, and money. When we build an internal tool ourselves, we don't have to justify it to the financial department the same way, but the lack of a bill doesn't make something free.
The FLOSS community talks about freedom as an intellectual property right. The digital generation assumes that software without a charge is selling their information. Let’s talk about the other kind of free - the kind where you are just not clear on how much you’re paying for something, because it’s an internal tool.
When we make a build vs. buy calculation, it's easy to miss several important parts of the calculation, including maintenance, updating, security, availability, and finding operators. None of those are easy to articulate or value for either side.
To help argue a decision for cultural change and/or spending money on tools, I'll walk you through several examples and talk about how business value is more than money. You'll leave with a set of questions to ask about quality, cost, and long-term use.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The audience will leave with new tools to evaluate their tool spending and new ways to think about the cost of things that we build accidentally, along the way.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Waterhouse

Heidi Waterhouse

Developer Advocate, LaunchDarkly
Heidi is a developer advocate with LaunchDarkly. She delights in working at the intersection of usability, risk reduction, and cutting-edge technology. One of her favorite hobbies is talking to developers about things they already knew but had never thought of that way before. She... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Hermitage Ballroom C

1:30pm

Getting started with Azure DevOps (Donovan Brown)

Abstract:
DevOps is about people, process, and products. Getting it all right requires effort, but the benefits to your organization and customers can be huge. Microsoft has a fantastic set of products that can help you get the most out of the cloud with any language on any platform. In this demo-heavy session, Donovan Brown shows you how to transform your team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Become familiar with a platform to help companies on their DevOps transformation.


Speakers
avatar for Donovan Brown

Donovan Brown

Principal DevOps Manager, Microsoft
Meet The Man in the Black Shirt. Donovan Brown is a Principal DevOps Manager on Microsoft's Cloud Developer Advocacy team. Why is DevOps one of the hottest topics? Because it hurts the most. Luckily, Donovan's unofficial tagline is #RubDevOpsOnIt and he's here to make it all better. Before joining Microsoft, Donovan spent seven years as a Process Consultant and a Certified Scrum Master. Developer Tools are his thing. Donovan has traveled the globe helping companies in the U.S., Canada, India, Germany, and the UK develop solutions... Read More →


Wednesday May 1, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Hermitage Ballroom E

1:30pm

Principles of Collaborative Automation (Jessica Kerr)

Abstract:
Great automation doesn't replace humans; it enhances us. When we are choosing or building tools for our team, we want them to play like team members: keep us informed, make the easy decisions repeatably, and pass the hard decisions to the humans along with the information we need to make them.
Based on research in human-centered design, this talk enumerates principles and challenges of collaboration for programs. It lists strategies for eliminating "human error" as well as human frustration. Our tools should make us smarter, not hide knowledge from us. In aviation and medicine, this is a million-dollar investment--but when we construct our own tools, collaborative automation is within our reach.

Learning Outcomes:
  • People who write development tools (including for themselves) will learn how to make them work better with people.
  • Developers will learn something about making software feel more collaborative to their users
  • Everyone will be more frustrated with their existing tools that don't follow these principles, and motivated to look for ones that do.


Speakers

Wednesday May 1, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Hermitage Ballroom D

2:25pm

Closing Remarks
Wednesday May 1, 2019 2:25pm - 3:00pm
Hermitage Ballroom